Posts tagged sculpture

Renowned Chinese artist and political dissident Ai Weiwei has just launched his largest solo exhibition to date, called Evidence, in Berlin’s Martin-Gropius-Bau. The show is expansive, sprawling across 3,000 square meters and 18 rooms. The centerpiece of the exhibit is an installation called Stools, which features a staggering number of 6,000 wooden stools arranged in the atrium.

Evidence will be on display from April 3 to July 7.

Melbourne-based visual artist Penny Byrne uses materials such as vintage porcelain figurines and other found objects to create artworks that wield a powerful political message. These manipulated, mutilated and painted figurines explore issues concerning the environment, pop culture and global politics, all presented through Byrne’s inimitable mix of wry satire and playful humor. Byrne’s reputation as a respected ceramics conservator informs her practice, rendering her works as meticulous and studied subversions.

Gianni Colombo - Spazio Curvo (1992)

Gianni Colombo - Spazio Curvo (1992)

Flower Matango, Takashi Murakami, 2006

Flower Matango, Takashi Murakami, 2006

p>Pierluigi Fracassi is a multidisciplinary Italian artist. He works in everything from photography to sculpture. In his installation work, Fracassi uses mirrors, bones, and thread to great effect. He also uses a lot of text in his works, like the mirrored piece, “Verresti al ballo con me?” (will you go to prom with me?). Cold and humane at the same time, definitely some interesting stuff going on. Click through to see more from the artist.

Blown Glass Microbiology Sculptures

  • by artist Luke Jerram

"Luke Jerram has created a number of extraordinary art projects which have excited and inspired people around the globe.Luke Jerram’s practice involves the creation of sculptures, installations, live arts projects and gifts. He is a Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the University of West of England. 

About Glass Microbiology
Glass Microbiology is a body of glass work which has been developed by artist Luke Jerram since 2004. Made to contemplate the global impact of each disease, the artworks are created as alternative representations of viruses to the artificially coloured imagery received through the media. In fact, viruses have no colour as they are smaller than the wavelength of light. By extracting the colour from the imagery and creating jewel-like beautiful sculptures in glass, a complex tension has arisen between the artworks’ beauty and what theyrepresent.

The Glass Microbiology sculptures are in museum collections around the world, including The Metropolitan Museum, NYC, The Wellcome Collection, London and The Museum of Glass, Shanghai. They are also regularly displayed in exhibitions around the globe and also sold to private collectors. In 2010, Jerram received the 25th Rakow Award for the series from The Corning Museum of Glass, New York. In 2009, his sculptures were presented at The Mori Museum, Tokyo along with work by Damien Hirst, Warhol and Leonardo da Vinci.

His transparent and colourless glassworks consider how the artificial colouring of scientific microbiological imagery, affects our understanding of these phenomena. See these examples of HIV imagery. If some images are coloured for scientific purposes, and others altered simply for aesthetic reasons, how can a viewer tell the difference? How many people believe viruses are brightly coloured? Are there any colour conventions and what kind of ‘presence’ do pseudocoloured images have that ‘naturally’ coloured specimens don’t? How does the choice of different colours affect their reception?

Photographs of Jerram’s glass artworks are now used widely in medical journals, text books and media stories and are seen as useful representations of virology within the scientific community. His work has been presented in the Lancet, the British Medical Journal and on the front cover of Nature Magazine.

The sculptures are designed in consultation with virologists from the University of Bristol, using a combination of different scientific photographs and models. They are made in collaboration with glassblowers Kim George, Brian Jones and Norman Veitch.

Limited Editions
Jerram’s Glass Microbiology artworks are available for sale to private collectors and public museums. Artworks are signed and dated, limited editions of just 5.”

(Source: Glass Microbiology by Luke Jeram via BuzzFeed)

Ben Foster

Created by mixed media artist Anila Quayyum Agha, this elaborately carved cube with an embedded light source projects a dazzling pattern of shadows onto the surrounding gallery walls. Titled Intersections, the installation is made from large panels of laser-cut wood meant to emulate the geometrical patters found in Islamic sacred spaces. Agha shares:

The Intersections project takes the seminal experience of exclusion as a woman from a space of community and creativity such as a Mosque and translates the complex expressions of both wonder and exclusion that have been my experience while growing up in Pakistan. The wooden frieze emulates a pattern from the Alhambra, which was poised at the intersection of history, culture and art and was a place where Islamic and Western discourses, met and co-existed in harmony and served as a testament to the symbiosis of difference. I have given substance to this mutualism with the installation project exploring the binaries of public and private, light and shadow, and static and dynamic. This installation project relies on the purity and inner symmetry of geometric design, the interpretation of the cast shadows and the viewer’s presence with in a public space.

Intersections is currently a finalist in the 3rd Annual See.Me: Year in Review Competition, and you can learn more about it here

Anish Kapoor.

Anish Kapoor.